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Posts tagged with "racism"

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

-

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

THAT’S THE PRICE YOU PAY FOR OWNING EVERYTHING

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem)

Jul 9

latinagabi:

strugglingtobeheard:

manif3stlove:

dapperedown:

musingsofanawkwardblackgirl:

humansofcolor:

onlyblackgirl:

valariesue:

the-unfriendlyblackhottie:

clarknokent:

midnight-sun-rising:

goldroadtonowhere:

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Stop what you’re doing and watch this. Especially if you have a problem with AAVE or broken English. 

Yes love!!!

This is wonderful

yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas!

YES YESYES YES

OMFG, yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes

beautiful 

I feel like the people who can’t relate in the audience look so awkward..

She deserves all the snaps

yooooooooooooooooooooooooo

That was amazing and super good and she’s gorgeous lol

watch this before you mock ‘broken’ or ‘ghetto’ english again. and to the english man who once told me ‘you speak good english for a latina’ I say, ya honey, not only do I speak english, but my english is so good I can switch between the colonizing and the colonized, but you stay on the former.

Jul 3
thinkmexican:

Challenge the Narrative
The real “immigration crisis” began in 1492. We’re still Indigenous, and they’re still settler-colonialists.

thinkmexican:

Challenge the Narrative

The real “immigration crisis” began in 1492. We’re still Indigenous, and they’re still settler-colonialists.

fuckyeahpocstandupcomedy:

Aamer Rahman talks about ‘random’ security tests at the airport. 

onlyblackgirl:

The history of film in one scene

(Source: frankoceanvevo)

Guilty And Charged

So basically, the US is throwing people into debtors’ prison. Didn’t people condemn this shit in the 1800s? UGH.

(Source: gayhughhefner)

invisiblelad:

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School
In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassment—kicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school. In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”
Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”
Read more: Education - GOOD
truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”


She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

Reason # 67422 why I’m homeschooling

Be careful home schooling or allowing highschool kids to go to school online. If the school is not accredited colleges will not accept their diplomas. The kids will have to get their GED’s. Always research who accredits a school and if the accreditation is in good standing.

these teachers kicking her out of school just proves she was deadass right

Why teach the content if they can’t handle critical thought regarding it?

invisiblelad:

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School

In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassmentkicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school.

In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”

Read more: Education - GOOD

truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”

She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

Reason # 67422 why I’m homeschooling

Be careful home schooling or allowing highschool kids to go to school online. If the school is not accredited colleges will not accept their diplomas. The kids will have to get their GED’s. Always research who accredits a school and if the accreditation is in good standing.

these teachers kicking her out of school just proves she was deadass right

Why teach the content if they can’t handle critical thought regarding it?

(Source: daughtersofdig)

We invoke the words of Jefferson and Lincoln because they say something about our legacy and our traditions. We do this because we recognize our links to the past—at least when they flatter us. But black history does not flatter American democracy; it chastens it. The popular mocking of reparations as a harebrained scheme authored by wild-eyed lefties and intellectually unserious black nationalists is fear masquerading as laughter. Black nationalists have always perceived something unmentionable about America that integrationists dare not acknowledge—that white supremacy is not merely the work of hotheaded demagogues, or a matter of false consciousness, but a force so fundamental to America that it is difficult to imagine the country without it.

- The Case for Reparations — Ta-Nehisi Coates

After 40 years of impoverished black men getting prison time for selling weed, white men are planning to get rich doing the same things. So that’s why I think we have to start talking about reparations for the war on drugs. How do we repair the harms caused?

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Michelle Alexander  (via lugardepiedras)

Always reblog, because I’ve noticed the media salivating over all these *white* weed entrepreneurs for being so “ingenious” and “savvy businessmen”, while ignoring the the mostly Black, Brown and poor victims and survivors of Amerikkka’s “War On Drugs”, and the ongoing racist and classist injustices that keep locking away Black, Brown and poor people in masses while giving white people who commit the same offenses less or no jail time at all.

(via the-uncensored-she)